June 28, 2018

MRI scans may detect early signs of brain damage caused by high blood pressure, say researchers. Damage that can potentially cause strokes that are suspected of contributing to Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

Vascular risk factors are thought to be a primary cause of dementia — experts call it a bigger culprit than genetics. And high blood pressure, or hypertension, is known as a “silent killer,” often going undetected as it harms the brain, kidneys, and other internal organs.

Treatment for dementia typically occurs only after cognitive symptoms are detected, even for patients with known risk factors.

A new Italian study has the potential to change that.

“This points to an early change that’s worth considering in the prevention of or delayed onset of dementia,” Dr. Gustavo Román, a neurologist with the Houston Methodist Nantz National Alzheimer Center. The technique also has the potential to improve early detection of other types of neurological disease.

You can read the full Healthline.com article here.



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