June 28, 2018

MRI scans may detect early signs of brain damage caused by high blood pressure, say researchers. Damage that can potentially cause strokes that are suspected of contributing to Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

Vascular risk factors are thought to be a primary cause of dementia — experts call it a bigger culprit than genetics. And high blood pressure, or hypertension, is known as a “silent killer,” often going undetected as it harms the brain, kidneys, and other internal organs.

Treatment for dementia typically occurs only after cognitive symptoms are detected, even for patients with known risk factors.

A new Italian study has the potential to change that.

“This points to an early change that’s worth considering in the prevention of or delayed onset of dementia,” Dr. Gustavo Román, a neurologist with the Houston Methodist Nantz National Alzheimer Center. The technique also has the potential to improve early detection of other types of neurological disease.

You can read the full Healthline.com article here.



share this post

 

More News & Updates

Honoring Champions|Honoring Commitments

One of the reasons why we took on a 4,000 mile cross-country tour during the middle of a pandemic, was to meet up with some of our contributors so that they could see their Champion’s name on the car in person. At the Nantz National Alzheimer Center we spent some time with Bruce Mowry, owner […]

Read more
Nick and Phil in front of IMSA

The Journey Begins

We are underway Starting today at Daytona International Speedway, our team, led by our founder Phil Frengs and lead driver, Nick Galante, is driving across the country on a 4,000 mile road trip to fund Alzheimer’s care and research:   Please join us by making a $250 donation today. Our corporate sponsor, Legistics, will be […]

Read more

On The Road Again: The Ultimate Tour For The Cure

The 2020 racing season started off with the most successful fundraising to date; 75 names on our car for the first race. Then COVID-19 hit and the season ground to halt. While we waited for the season to restart, we wondered: What could we do to honor our Champions, and continue to draw attention to […]

Read more

My Champion: My Father, Dr. Alan Singer

My Champion: My Dad, Dr. Alan Singer By Meredith Singer-Moreadith Dr. Alan Singer lived by the belief that “we are our brother’s keeper.” This maxim would be reflected across his entire life. Born in Washington DC in 1942, Dr. Singer grew up an only child to working class parents. Music, theater, and reading were his passions; […]

Read more